Discipline ideas for a youth group and useful for discipline in a school
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CHRISTIAN YOUTH RESOURCES




Youth Bible Study Resources
by Rob Lamont
Rob Lamont started paid youth Ministry in 1978 and is evangelical, reformed, (That means Bible believing) and has written these resources from a Biblically conservative position.

Rob has worked for such groups as Bible Society and Scripture Union and is a Westminster Presbyterian Minister.

Rob currently is the Scripture teacher and chaplain at Kellyville High School ( A state High School in Sydney , Au)
where he teaches Christian Education, runs 3 Bible studies and 6 prayer groups) He also coordinates Scripture teaching for Rouse Hill High School. He has preached for over 20 different denominations
and lectured at numerous Bible Colleges.


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GENERAL GUIDELINE ON DISCIPLINE

A leader needs to be
         Collected
         Confident
         Prepared
         Able to Communicate

1. THING I CAN DO BEFORE A GROUP STARTS.
- State the rules and the punishments before the group starts.
- Plan staggered levels of punishment, to increase with the level of bad behaviour.

2. THINGS I SHOULD BE BEFORE A GROUP STARTS.
- Planned and have a clear direction.
- Know your target audience.
- Feel alright about my self.
- Know why you are leading.

3. THINGS I SHOULD DO DURING THE GROUP.
- Stop wrong behaviour in the bud before it gets out of hand.
- Show no favouritism and be impartial.
- Be confident.
- Give clear directions

4. THINGS I SHOULD BE DURING THE GROUP.
- Honest and not use the position of leader to get my own way.
- Not bend any of the rules that I expect the members to obey.
- Be fair and just in running the program
- Be interested in the group.
- Not boring
- Clear in giving directions
- Involved in the program rather than sitting back and just watching.

5. WHEN THINGS GO WRONG.
Look for possible causes that may happen outside the group.
- Poor home life.
- Personality.
- Rebellious.
- Low concentration.
- Low learning skills or comprehension skills.
- Talkative

Possible causes relating to the group or the leaders
- Personality clash
- Boring or poorly run program.
- Poorly planned and prepared
- Program not relevant
- Clichés
 
 


PRACTICAL WAYS TO HELP OVERCOME DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS

-  Let the parents be informed and involved
-  Have written rules
-  Use handouts or resource books during the talk or small group time.
-  When you are speaking start loud then start to speak softer.
-  When you are speaking start slow then slowly start speaking faster.
 -  Use some of the leaders as trouble shooters, who can take people aside and talk to them about  their behaviour.
 

SITUATIONS (Discussion Questions)

1.  Someone arrives drunk or stoned.
2.  A fight between two members.
3.  People running in and out of the group
4.  Will not participate in the program
5.  Talking during the talk
6.  Back chatting to the leaders
7.  Calling leaders names
8.  Hitting people.
9.  Playing the games too hard.
10.  Cheating.
11.  Swearing
12.  Leaving the group without permission
13.  Playing off leaders against each other


HOW TO CONTROL LARGE GROUPS

Adequate control  generally involves the leader "connecting" with the members. This is achieved when the members respect the leader and realize that they have something worth listening to. Below are some guidelines to achieve this.
 

1. IF THE LEADER IS COMPOSED THEN THE MEMBERS WILL BE CONFIDENT
A.  Don't be negative about the members and putting them down.
B.  Don't dress to try to be the latest fashion, sincerity counts more than clothing for peoples   credibility.
C.  If the group is noisy start speaking loudly and slowly, as this creates a calm atmosphere and  gets peoples attention. Then start to speaker faster and softer once you have got their  attention. If you speak too fast, it may make the group excitable.
D.  Give clear instructions that are easily understood, before the activity is undertaken by a group. e.g.. explain a game whilst everyone is seated, then run it.
E. At the beginning of the year start formal and relax the programme as a reward.
 

2. IF THE LEADER IS REASONABLE THEN THE KIDS WILL RESPOND

A.  Most youth like definite guidelines for discipline and what is acceptable.
 B.  Do not ask the group for ideas of what you can do next or if they will like the next activity,  because only might will prevail rather than truth. Secondly, it means you come across as  unprepared. Thirdly, by the time someone has explained a game idea (normally explained  poorly) you would have lost the other members interest. It is better to just say " this is what we will do next."
C.  Do not try one-upmanship with the members because someone will always lose. It is not a   competition of whom is best or who is the boss.
D.  In discipline always be fair and just.
 

3. IF THE LEADER IS PREPARED THEN THE MEMBERS WILL BE PRESENT
A.  Always start on time or people will see that it is okay to be late.
B.  Be interesting and know where the program is heading.
C.  Give advanced notice of things so that the members will be prepared.
 

4. IF THE LEADER IS CREDIBLE THEN THE MEMBERS WILL BE CONTROLLED

A.  Do not try to be something that you are not to please an audience. Sincerity counts more than hype.
 B.  Be aware that most talks are affirming known information, therefore give information a practical usable framework rather than just abstract guidelines.
 

5. CONTROL AND COMMUNICATION CAN BEST BE ACHIEVED BY

A.   Using variety in the program, e.g.. audiovisuals, drama, sheets, songs etc.
B.  Let the talks be of a nature that directly relates to the members.
C.  Have a clear goal about what you are trying to say.
D.  All leaders need to participate in the program not just the one running the program.
 


HOW TO CONTROL SMALL GROUPS

THINGS I CAN DO BEFORE THE GROUP STARTS

1. Seating. Make sure the seating is comfortable, that everyone can be seen and preferably the  same height. (Not sitting, lying down, standing etc.)
2.  Move any potential noisy members apart before you start.
 3.  Start the group once silence and good behaviour has been achieved. This will set the tone of the group and allows orderly conversation.
5.  Plan beforehand the material that you are to cover.
6.  Be prepared for the group and know what your aim is for the group.
 

TROUBLE SHOOTING

 1.  Stop noise or out of turn speaking in the bud. If people cannot answer normally then go around the circle for answers or answer after raising their hand.

 2.  Don't start side conversations with just a sub set of members as this may lead others to do the same. People will rarely wait for this conversation to finish and may try to speak over the top. If a conversation is important then arrange to leave it till later.

 Don't let one person dominate even if they have the right answers. Suggest that other opinions may be interesting to hear.
 

3. QUIET GROUPS.
This may be caused by the group being
  - quiet  or shy personalities
  - very polite
  - nervous if a stranger is present
  - don't understand the questions
  - want to the group to finish as quick as possible
  - threatening questions 

You need to determine the cause and then take action.

1.  Don't tell someone that they are dumb or that they have to share.
2.  As a leader you need to gain their respect by how you act not just because you are a leader.